Introductions For Biblical Essays

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S1 Taylor S… Ogedi Omenyinma THEO 104-D77 Introduction Hope Theological Definition: Within the Old Testament, there are Hebrew verbs that correspond or may be related to the word “hope.” One of these words are qawa, this word can represent “hope” in the denotation of “trust.” Jeremiah address God in the biblical scripture stating “Among the nations’ idols is there any that gives rain? Or can the mere heavens send showers? Is it not you alone, O Lord, our God, to whom we look? You alone have done all these things” (Jeremiah 14:22, The New American Bible). “O Hope of Israel, O Lord, our savior in time of need! Why should you be a stranger in this land, like a traveler who has stopped but for a night?” (Jeremiah 14:8, The New American Bible). Jeremiah also uses the qwh that is used to teach that the Lord is the hope of Israel. Biblical Foundation: The definition of hope is having high expectations of what is coming or what is to come. In other words, biblical hope is not simply having a desire or high expectations about something good to come in the future. Bible hope is similar to having natural hope, because biblical hope is said to be a confident expectation and desire for something good in the future. Biblical hope also looks away from what man wants and focuses on its promises from God. S2 Practical Application: As a college student I have hopes and dreams. I hope that I am able to continue through college earning good grades and doing my best to study hard. In the meantime, I hope I am able to continue my business and gain customers for future growth. I have realized throughout life that you hope for a lot of things as a child. You can hope for new toys, clothes, or video games. As you grow older your hopes start to change. You begin hoping for a car, money, or hoping to get accepted to the college you applied to. As you become an adult your hopes start to mature and you begin to hope for children, begin able to own a house, marriage, and having success in your future. While hoping for things you should always keep God within those hopes and dreams. God understands what we are thinking and He hears our thoughts. We should always let him into our mind and soul so He can guide us in the right direction to keep our hopes alive. Sometimes hope and hope in God is the only thing that can get people through their hard times. Prayer Theological Application: Prayer is known as a privilege or obligation. Christians pray to God in troubling times or in times for themselves or other. There are confessions, adoration, and thanksgiving through prayers and this helps us communicate with God. In the bible, some Hebrew terms focus on some sense to petition in the scripture. Prayer is to be reserved throughout everyday life, not just to be used for troubled times. Within the Old Testament there are two emphasis to prayer. In the first emphasis, is tied closely together within a covenant between God and His people. The second emphasis, is the key representative ministries as intercessors. Biblical Foundation: Jesus’s lifestyle revolved around praying for himself and others. As stated in this scripture, “He was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples.” (Luke 11:1, The S3 New American Bible). Prayer is not be feared and we should never fear from calling to God. “Call to me, and I will answer you; I will tell to you things great beyond reach of your knowledge.” (Jeremiah 33:3, The New American Bible). That Bible scriptures tells you that God hears and will answer your prayers. God may not respond with an answer you wanted but he responds on time. The Bible also teaches us that prayers are may not primarily be about us, if we should wonder what to pray about, giving God a list of things we want and desire, or that prayer should be passive. Instead, the Bible teaches us that there is thanks in having prayers and giving prayers to other people. Practical Application: When I was younger, I would always think about others who did not have what I had. I remember when I was a child my grandpa took my brother and I to a local food bank on Thanksgiving Day and we handed out food to the homeless. It amazed me because here I am with a roof over my head, food at my table, and I was fortunate enough to have a mother that would buy my buy my brother and I, things we wanted. While I was handing out food, I saw families walk in with children that were the same age as me and it made me sad because they had to come to a food bank to receive food every day. Later that evening, we went home and I was sad and I have prayed ever since for people who are not fortunate enough to have greater things in life. Prayer can be for yourself although, sometimes it is better to pray for others that do not have luxuries as you. Works Cited S4 The New American Bible. Ed. Stephen J. Hartdegen, Christian P. Ceroke, Patrick Cardinal O’Boyle, James Cardinal Hickey, Daniel E. Pilarcyzk. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1987. Print.

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