Best College Admission Essay Book

Paperback – 299 pages; Mentor Books

100 Successful College Application Essays has been around for a while. On the cover, under the two authors’ names is the additional phrase “With Members of the Staff of The Harvard Independent.” There’s that name again. I have to wonder if Mentor Books’ marketing department would have included that extra byline had those “members” been associated with The Bowling Green Independent. I guess we’ll never know.

I fancy myself as something of a connoisseur of application essays, having even written about them at great length in America’s Elite Colleges: The Smart Buyer’s Guide to the Ivy League and Other Top Schools (Princeton Review-Random House 2001). In light of that, I have to say that I wasn’t all that impressed with the “successful” essays presented in this book. Granted, some of the writers got into very prestigious colleges and the essays’ critical commentaries come from one college admissions director and a large group of prep school counselors and admissions staffers. I would have preferred the balance of reviewers to be more heavily weighted toward college admissions people, but that’s just me.

In my view, this collection of essays suffers in comparison to the examples proffered by Harry Bauld in his legendary On Writing the College Application Essay (Barnes and Noble Books, 1987). Bauld gives us the good and the bad. We can profit by seeing what and how not to write. Here, the authors’ approach is to guide by “successful” example only, a tact that can be risky. Why? Well, we don’t get to see some of the other supporting aspects of these writers’ applications. Obviously, they didn’t all get into their respective colleges on the weight of their essays.

Bauld, by comparison, shows us how even borderline candidates can strongly bolster their admission chances by carefully examining their lives and writing about seemingly innocuous issues. For example, Bauld rhapsodizes on the greatness of one student’s lead: “I do some of my best thinking in the bathroom.” Sheer poetry.

Another curious aspect of this book about “successful” essays is that some of the commentaries are less than laudatory. For example, one commentator notes about a Princetonian’s essay: “This essay is a nice one which [sic] unfortunately falls a little short. The topic is fun to read about, but the ending leaves a great deal to be desired. I am left with-what was the subject? Didn’t he have another paragraph?”

Hmm. Sounds like this applicant may have had some other things going for him. I have to wonder why the authors would have included an essay that elicited such a less-than-flattering comment from its reviewer.

To be fair, there are some good, even unique essays here with some appropriate critical analyses. However, this reviewer recommends that if you’re looking for the quickest and most fun way to get from Point A, where your writing is now, to Point B, producing a successful college application essay, get Bauld. To paraphrase Churchill, with Bauld, never has so much writing wisdom been packed into so few pages containing such enjoyment.

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Education Life

Picture this before you plop yourself down in front of your computer to compose your college application essay: A winter-lit room is crammed with admissions professionals and harried faculty members who sit around a big table covered with files. The admissions people, often young and underpaid, buzz with enthusiasm; the professors frequently pause to take off their glasses and rub their eyes.

These exhausted folks, hopped up from eating too many cookies and brownies, have been sitting in committee meetings for days after spending a couple of months reading applications, most of which look pretty similar: baseball = life, or debate = life, or “I went to a developing country and discovered poor people can be happy.”

They wade through long lists of candidates, state by state, region by region. The best applications and the weakest don’t come to committee. It’s the gigantic stack in the middle that warrants discussion.

The truth is, most essays are typical. Many are boring. Some are just plain bad. But occasionally one will make an admissions officer tear down the hallway to find a colleague to whom she can say, “You have to read what this Math Olympiad girl said about ‘Hamlet.’ ” Your goal is to write an essay that makes someone fall in love with you.

Once you commit the time and emotional energy to get your butt in the chair to write, you face a daunting task — figuring out what to write about. If you’re stuck, you’re in good company. With so much freedom, this is a challenge for most students.

Here’s a tip: Choose a topic you really want to write about. If the subject doesn’t matter to you, it won’t matter to the reader. Write about whatever keeps you up at night. That might be cars, or coffee. It might be your favorite book or the Pythagorean theorem. It might be why you don’t believe in evolution or how you think kale must have hired a PR firm to get people to eat it.

A good topic will be complex. In school, you were probably encouraged to write papers that took a side. That’s fine in academic work when you’re being asked to argue in support of a position, but in a personal essay, you want to express more nuanced thinking and explore your own clashing emotions. In an essay, conflict is good.

For example, “I love my mom. She’s my best friend. We share clothes and watch ‘The Real Housewives’ of three different cities together” does not make for a good essay. “I love my mom even though she makes me clean my room, hates my guinea pig and is crazy about disgusting food like kale” could lead somewhere

While the personal essay has to be personal, a reader can learn a lot about you from whatever you choose to focus on and how you describe it. One of my favorites from when I worked in admissions at Duke University started out, “My car and I are a lot alike.” The writer then described a car that smelled like wet dog and went from 0 to 60 in, well, it never quite got to 60.

Another guy wrote about making kimchi with his mom. They would go into the garage and talk, really talk: “Once my mom said to me in a thick Korean accent, ‘Every time you have sex, I want you to make sure and use a condo.’ I instantly burst into laughter and said, ‘Mom, that could get kind of expensive!’ ” A girl wrote about her feminist mother’s decision to get breast implants.

A car, kimchi, Mom’s upsizing — the writers used these objects as vehicles to get at what they had come to say. They allowed the writer to explore the real subject: This is who I am.

Don’t brag about your achievements. Instead, look at times you’ve struggled or, even better, failed. Failure is essayistic gold. Figure out what you’ve learned. Write about that. Be honest and say the hardest things you can. And remember those exhausted admissions officers sitting around a table in the winter. Jolt them out of their sugar coma and give them something to be excited about.

10 Things Students Should Avoid

REPEATING THE PROMPT Admissions officers know what’s on their applications. Don’t begin, “A time that I failed was when I tried to beat up my little brother and I realized he was bigger than me.” You can start right in: “As I pulled my arm back to throw a punch, it struck me: My brother had gotten big. Bigger than me.”

LEAVE WEBSTER’S OUT OF IT Unless you’re using a word like “prink” (primp) or “demotic” (popular) or “couloir” (deep gorge), you can assume your reader knows the definition of the words you’ve written. You’re better off not starting your essay with “According to Webster’s Dictionary . . . .”

THE EPIGRAPH Many essays start with a quote from another writer. When you have a limited amount of space, you don’t want to give precious real estate to someone else’s words.

YOU ARE THERE! When writing about past events, the present tense doesn’t allow for reflection. All you can do is tell the story. This happens, then this happens, then this happens. Some beginning writers think the present tense makes for more exciting reading. You’ll see this is a fallacy if you pay attention to how many suspenseful novels are written in past tense.

SOUND EFFECTSOuch! Thwack! Whiz! Whooooosh! Pow! Are you thinking of comic books? Certainly, good writing can benefit from a little onomatopoeia. Clunk is a good one. Or fizz. But once you start adding exclamation points, you’re wading into troubled waters. Do not start your essay with a bang!

ACTIVE BODY PARTS One way to make your reader giggle is to give body parts their own agency. When you write a line like “His hands threw up,” the reader might get a visual image of hands barfing. “My eyes fell to the floor.” Ick.

CLICHÉS THINK YOUR THOUGHTS FOR YOU Here’s one: There is nothing new under the sun. We steal phrases and ideas all the time. George Orwell’s advice: “Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.”

TO BE OR NOT TO BE Get rid of “to be” verbs. Replace “was” in “The essay was written by a student; it was amazing and delightful” and you’ll get: “The student’s essay amazed and delighted me.” We’ve moved from a static description to a sprightlier one and cut the word count almost in half.

WORD PACKAGES Some phrases — free gift, personal beliefs, final outcome, very unique — come in a package we don’t bother to unpack. They’re redundant.

RULES TO IGNORE In English class, you may have to follow a list of rules your teacher says are necessary for good grammar: Don’t use contractions. No sentence fragments. It’s imperative to always avoid split infinitives. Ending on a preposition is the sort of English up with which teachers will not put. And don’t begin a sentence with a conjunction like “and” or “but” or “because.” Pick up a good book. You’ll see that the best authors ignore these fussy, fusty rules.

Rachel Toor is a creative writing professor at Eastern Washington University in Spokane. This essay is adapted from her new book, “Write Your Way In: Crafting an Unforgettable College Admissions Essay.”

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page 11 of Education Life with the headline: Conquering the Admissions Essay. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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